Four Great Ways to Handle Your Scrapbooking Journaling

4 Great Ways to Use in Scrapbooking Journaling
Scrapbooking journaling is an integral part of the design that most veterans or professional scrapbookers don’t ever treat their work as a finished project unless it has some journaling in it. And it’s not just about putting dates and names on your page; journaling in scrapbooking means letting your audience know more about the subject, and what your thoughts are about that subject.
Some beginners find it difficult to do scrapbooking journaling, especially if they don’t do it often, so I thought I’d give some ideas about this technique that anyone can use for their layouts.
Use your blog posts – If you frequently blog about personal events or anything that happens in your life, this would be a great opportunity to integrate blogging into your scrapbooking. Some scrapbookers record their thoughts, feelings, and also some pictures into their blogs long before they start doing a scrapbook page about a subject. By the time they get around to creating a scrapbook page, most of those emotions may have melted away. If this happens, you can just use your blog posts as inspiration for your journaling. It doesn’t have to be a complete paragraph, either; you can use some snippets from your blog and use those instead.
Postcards – When you’re on a trip to a faraway country or some other long-distance location, it would be a great idea to grab some postcards from the place and use those in your scrapbooks. The postcards can lend an authentic feel of the place you visited, plus you can also do some journaling on the postcard itself while you’re still on your vacation. That way, whatever you want to scrap about is still fresh in your mind, and you can just integrate it into your page when you get back home.
Private Journaling – Is there such a thing as private journaling when it comes to scrapbooks? After all, you are making something that is designed to be enjoyed by more people than just yourself. However, it can be done, and in creative ways, too. For example, if you’re making a scrapbook page about your engagement, you can include some journaling in the page itself, but also reserve the intimate details in a separate booklet or tag inside the front or back cover of the album. This way, you still have the information on hand for your public audience, but your more private details aren’t exactly calling out to be read.
Using Your Handwriting – Lots of scrapbookers are learning that using their own handwriting for journaling is the best way to go. It simply adds more soul and personality into your work. But let’s face it: there aren’t a lot of scrapbookers out there with gorgeous, elegant handwriting. So it’s really common to see scrapbookers hesitating to write directly on their scrapbook pages. Another reason would be because they are worried about messing up and dirtying the pages with ink and whatnot.
The best solution to this problem would be to do some journaling on a card or other piece of paper before you attach that paper on the page. A lot of scrapbookers would swear that this is actually easier than trying to write directly on that page, which might be already full of embellishments. Another solution would be to go digital. For just a few dollars, you can scan your own handwriting and use that as a font to print out your journaling. I’ve seen several scrapbooks using this technique to scrap about an ancient recipe from their grandmother. It turns out beautifully and you avoid the risk of messing up your work.Scrapbooking journaling is an integral part of the design that most veterans or professional scrapbookers don’t ever treat their work as a finished project unless it has some journaling in it. And it’s not just about putting dates and names on your page; journaling in scrapbooking means letting your audience know more about the subject, and what your thoughts are about that subject.

Some beginners find it difficult to do scrapbooking journaling, especially if they don’t do it often, so I thought I’d give some ideas about this technique that anyone can use for their layouts.

Use your blog posts - If you frequently blog about personal events or anything that happens in your life, this would be a great opportunity to integrate blogging into your scrapbooking. Some scrapbookers record their thoughts, feelings, and also some pictures into their blogs long before they start doing a scrapbook page about a subject. By the time they get around to creating a scrapbook page, most of those emotions may have melted away. If this happens, you can just use your blog posts as inspiration for your journaling. It doesn’t have to be a complete paragraph, either; you can use some snippets from your blog and use those instead.

Postcards - When you’re on a trip to a faraway country or some other long-distance location, it would be a great idea to grab some postcards from the place and use those in your scrapbooks. The postcards can lend an authentic feel of the place you visited, plus you can also do some journaling on the postcard itself while you’re still on your vacation. That way, whatever you want to scrap about is still fresh in your mind, and you can just integrate it into your page when you get back home.

Private Journaling - Is there such a thing as private journaling when it comes to scrapbooks? After all, you are making something that is designed to be enjoyed by more people than just yourself. However, it can be done, and in creative ways, too. For example, if you’re making a scrapbook page about your engagement, you can include some journaling in the page itself, but also reserve the intimate details in a separate booklet or tag inside the front or back cover of the album. This way, you still have the information on hand for your public audience, but your more private details aren’t exactly calling out to be read.

Using Your Handwriting - Lots of scrapbookers are learning that using their own handwriting for journaling is the best way to go. It simply adds more soul and personality into your work. But let’s face it: there aren’t a lot of scrapbookers out there with gorgeous, elegant handwriting. So it’s really common to see scrapbookers hesitating to write directly on their scrapbook pages. Another reason would be because they are worried about messing up and dirtying the pages with ink and whatnot.

The best solution to this problem would be to do some journaling on a card or other piece of paper before you attach that paper on the page. A lot of scrapbookers would swear that this is actually easier than trying to write directly on that page, which might be already full of embellishments. Another solution would be to go digital. For just a few dollars, you can scan your own handwriting and use that as a font to print out your journaling. I’ve seen several scrapbooks using this technique to scrap about an ancient recipe from their grandmother. It turns out beautifully and you avoid the risk of messing up your work.